Randall D Alexander, MD – Orthopaedic Arm Care Specialist
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Shoulder

Shoulder Anatomy :: Rotator Cuff Tear :: Shoulder Impingement :: SLAP lesions
Shoulder Arthroscopy :: Frozen Shoulder :: Shoulder Joint Replacement :: Shoulder Instability

Normal Anatomy of the Shoulder Joint

How does the Shoulder joint work?
Find out more in this web based movie.

Normal Anatomy of the Shoulder Joint  

Rotator Cuff Tear

Rotator cuff is the group of tendons in the shoulder joint providing support and enabling wider range of motion. Major injury to these tendons may result in tear of these tendons and the condition is called as rotator cuff tear.

For more information about Rotator Cuff Tear click on below tabs.

Rotator Cuff Tear Rotator Cuff Tear

Shoulder Impingement

Shoulder impingement is also called as swimmer's shoulder, tennis shoulder, or rotator cuff tendinitis. It is the condition of inflammation of the tendons of the shoulder joint caused by motor vehicle accidents, trauma, and while playing sports such as tennis, baseball, swimming and weight lifting.

For more information about Shoulder Impingement click on below tabs.

Shoulder Impingement Shoulder Impingement

Shoulder Arthroscopy

Shoulder arthroscopy is a surgical procedure in which an arthroscope is inserted into the shoulder joint. The benefits of arthroscopy are smaller incisions, faster healing, a more rapid recovery, and less scarring. Arthroscopic surgical procedures are often performed on an outpatient basis and the patient is able to return home on the same day.

For more information about Shoulder Arthroscopy click on below tabs.

Shoulder Arthroscopy Shoulder Arthroscopy

Frozen Shoulder

Frozen shoulder is the condition of painful shoulder limiting the movements because of pain and inflammation. It is also called as adhesive capsulitis and may progress to the state where an individual may feel very hard to move the shoulder.

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Frozen Shoulder Frozen Shoulder

Shoulder Joint Replacement

Shoulder joint replacements are usually done to relieve pain and when all non-operative treatment to relieve pain have failed.

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Shoulder Joint Replacement Shoulder Joint Replacement

Shoulder Instability

Shoulder instability is a chronic condition that causes frequent dislocations of the shoulder joint. A dislocation occurs when the end of the humerus (the ball portion) partially or completely dislocates from the glenoid (the socket portion) of the shoulder. A partial dislocation is referred to as a subluxation whereas a complete separation is referred to as a dislocation.

For more information about Shoulder Instability click on below tabs.

Shoulder Instability Shoulder Instability

SLAP Lesions

The shoulder joint is a ball and socket joint. A 'ball' at the top of the upper arm bone (the humerus) fits neatly into a 'socket', called the glenoid, which is part of the shoulder blade (scapula). The term SLAP (superior –labrum anterior-posterior) lesion refers to an injury of the superior labrum of the shoulder. The labrum is a ring of fibrous cartilage surrounding the glenoid for stabilization of the shoulder joint.

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SLAP Lesions
   

Click on the topics below to find out more from the Orthopaedic connection website of American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

The Shoulder

Shoulder injuries are frequently caused by athletic activities that involve excessive, repetitive, overhead motion, such as swimming, tennis, pitching, and weightlifting. Injuries can also occur during everyday activities such washing walls, hanging curtains, and gardening.

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Common Shoulder Injuries

In 2006, approximately 7.5 million people went to the doctor's office for a shoulder problem, including shoulder and upper arm sprains and strains. More than 4.1 million of these visits were for rotator cuff problems.

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Shoulder Trauma

Trauma to the shoulder is common. Injuries range from a separated shoulder resulting from a fall onto the shoulder to a high-speed car accident that fractures the shoulder blade (scapula) or collar bone (clavicle). One thing is certain: everyone injures his or her shoulder at some point in life.

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Biceps Tendon Tear at the Shoulder

The biceps muscle is in the front of your upper arm. It helps you bend your elbow and rotate your arm. It also helps keep your shoulder stable.

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Rotator Cuff Tears: Frequently Asked Questions

The rotator cuff is a large tendon comprised of four muscles which combine to form a "cuff" over the upper end of the arm, the head of the humerus. The four muscles—supraspinatus, infraspinatus, subscapularis and teres minor—originate from the "wing bone," the scapula, and together form a single tendon unit that inserts on the greater tuberosity of the humerus.

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Rotator Cuff Tears: Surgical Treatment Options

Surgery to repair a torn rotator cuff most often involves re-attaching the tendon to the head of humerus (upper arm bone). A partial tear, however, may need only a trimming or smoothing procedure called a debridement. A complete tear within the thickest part of the tendon is repaired by stitching the two sides back together.

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Burners and Stingers

Burners and stingers are common injuries in contact or collision sports. A burner or a stinger is an injury to the nerve supply of the upper arm, either at the neck or shoulder. The injury is named for the stinging or burning pain that spreads from the shoulder to the hand. This can feel like an electric shock or lightening bolt down the arm.

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Erb's Palsy (Brachial Plexus Birth Palsy)

Erb's palsy is a form of brachial plexus palsy. It is named for one of the doctors who first described this condition, Wilhelm Erb.

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Dislocated Shoulder

The shoulder joint is the body's most mobile joint. It can turn in many directions. But, this advantage also makes the shoulder an easy joint to dislocate.

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Tendonitis of the Long Head of the Biceps

Long head of biceps tendonitis is an inflammation or irritation of the upper biceps tendon. This strong, cord-like structure connects the upper end of the biceps muscle to the bones in the shoulder.

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Shoulder Pain

What most people call the shoulder is really several joints that combine with tendons and muscles to allow a wide range of motion in the arm — from scratching your back to throwing the perfect pitch.

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Reverse Total Shoulder Replacement

Every year, thousands of conventional total shoulder replacements are successfully done in the United States for patients with shoulder arthritis. This type of surgery, however, is not as beneficial for patients with large rotator cuff tears who have developed a complex type of shoulder arthritis called "cuff tear arthropathy." For these patients, conventional total shoulder replacement may result in pain and limited motion, and reverse total shoulder replacement may be an option.

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Shoulder Surgery

Your shoulder is the most flexible joint in your body. It allows you to place and rotate your arm in many positions in front, above, to the side, and behind your body. This flexibility also makes your shoulder susceptible to instability and injury.

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Shoulder Surgery Exercise Guide

Regular exercises to restore your normal shoulder motion and flexibility and a gradual return to everyday work and recreational activities are important for your full recovery.

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A Patient's Experience with Chronic Unstable Shoulder

The first time Gabe Nevin dislocated his shoulder, he was on a kayaking trip in his home state of Idaho. The injury was repaired, and Gabe, then a 16-year-old high school student, went back to kayaking and other sports. Soon after, Gabe's shoulder dislocated again. Over the next five years, Gabe experienced a cycle of recurrent dislocations and repairs, forcing him to stop participating in sports. Even day-to-day activities had to be done cautiously, because Gabe never knew when his shoulder might dislocate again.

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A Patient's Experience with Osteoarthritis of the Shoulder

Sandie Knopf is an active woman who enjoys skiing, tennis, weight training, cooking and dancing. Unfortunately, she suffers from osteoarthritis (OA) of the shoulder. OA is generally a progressive disease, but in Sandie's case, degeneration from OA occurred rapidly over a year.

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Rotator Cuff and Shoulder Conditioning Program

After an injury or surgery, an exercise conditioning program will help you return to daily activities and enjoy a more active, healthy lifestyle. Following a well-structured conditioning program will also help you return to sports and other recreational activities.

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Arthritis of the Shoulder

Although most people think of the shoulder as several joints, there are really two joints in the area of the shoulder. One is located where the collarbone (clavicle) meets the tip of the shoulder bone (acromion). This is called the acromioclavicular or AC joint.

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Broken Collarbone

A broken collarbone is also known as a clavicle fracture. This is a very common fracture that occurs in people of all ages.

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Dislocated Shoulder

The shoulder joint is the body's most mobile joint. It can turn in many directions. But, this advantage also makes the shoulder an easy joint to dislocate.

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Fracture of the shoulder blade (scapula)

Triangular, mobile, and protected by a complex system of surrounding muscles, the shoulder blade (scapula) is rarely broken. Scapula fractures represent less than 1% of all broken bones.

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Separated Shoulder

A shoulder separation is not truly an injury to the shoulder joint. The injury actually involves the acromioclavicular joint (also called the AC joint). The AC joint is where the collarbone (clavicle) meets the highest point of the shoulder blade (acromion).

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Shoulder Joint Tear (Glenoid Labrum Tear)

Advances in medical technology are enabling doctors to identify and treat injuries that went unnoticed 20 years ago. For example, physicians can now use miniaturized television cameras to see inside a joint. With this tool, they have been able to identify and treat a shoulder injury called a glenoid labrum tear.

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Thoracic outlet syndrome

The thoracic outlet is the space between your collarbone (clavicle) and your first rib. This narrow passageway is crowded with blood vessels, muscles, and nerves. If the shoulder muscles in your chest are not strong enough to hold the collarbone in place, it can slip down and forward, putting pressure on the nerves and blood vessels that lie under it. This causes a variety of symptoms which together are known as thoracic outlet syndrome.

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